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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to deal with him every week? and he has failed in foreign policy. what's the point of this whole thing? what's the point of this exercise? 'cause we know his real feelings. >> well, i certainly don't. look it, the president or foreign policy or our position with regard to the world and the way the world views us in the same way you do, sean, that's not going to be a big surprise, first of all, the palestinian-- >> suck up to the muslim world work? and he's-- >> i don't feel he did, i don't feel he did. >> sean: oh, stop, please. >> and i feel those were highlights that were distracting and we' are trivializing these issues. every president had problems besides bill clinton because israel does not want to establish a two-state solution and that's the-- >> and he said he was going to fix this and he wasn't able to. saying america was arrogant in cairo didn't work, did it, colonel west? >> well, sean, let's start with andrea mitchell over at msnbc, said this is the worst relationship she's seen and she's been covering since ronald reagan. and the first interview was al-arabi al-arabiya. a
me, joe, is that acceptable foreign policy in your mind? >> sean, look the prime minister of israel and bill clinton met at camp david with-- >> was he a terrorist. >> you can't do-- it doesn't matter whether he was or not. you have to deal with-- if you're going to have peace you have to work with both parties. you don't have to like both parties, but. >> sean: cover up the cross, but speak under a picture of arafat. >> we were meeting with abbas' on their turf, in their presidential arena and you come-- if you come to the white house, if you come to the white house and meet with our president and you don't like the fact that george washington is sitting over a desk-- >> george washington isn't a terrorist. and wait, i have a question. >> the british probably thought he was. >> sean: was he a terrorist? >> of course he was. >> sean: thank you, thank you. but the british probably thought that george washington was a terrorist. >> sean: if i was president, billy cunningham, i wouldn't speak under a picture of a terrorist. >> sean hannity we wondered what a second jimmy carter term wo
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
the significance of this visit and what it means for u.s. foreign policy moving forward. when we come back, the water cooler watching democracy at its finest. another political brawl in the ukrainian parliament. we have diving and fighting in the parliament. more details when "way too early" comes back. max and penny kept our bookstore exciting and would always come to my rescue. but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. >>> all right. time for the water cooler. democracy in action. ukrainian style. check it out in the parliament yesterday. where is it going to start? always looking for where it's going to start. push, push, push. just a melee breaks out. fistacuffs. somebody obviously spoke russian and they want to speak ukrainian. there was nearly an identical brawl back in decem
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
. >> you had a great number of things. the stories about the economy and stories about foreign policy etc.. what prompted me to write spin masters though is the benghazi attack and the days that followed. it became clear that the political news media rather than focusing on the story of foreign-policy failure and a president who had promised reproach along with the muslim world and was failing to produce it said
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
of all, they don't like covering foreign policy stories anymore. most of the bureaus have shut down around the world. they rely on stringers. we've got a lot of propaganda coming into the american media, and i think that while the ten-year anniversary is important, it's more important for the media to look into the fact that this isn't just about nation-states or any one leader. this is about a virus, radical islam, that continues to threaten not only the middle east, but much of the rest of the world. that's the real story that needs to continue to be written, in my view. jon: let me read for you part of the piece that appeared this morning, marvin, in "the new york post" which is owned by the parent corporation of this network. they write: jon: is this, in fact, a bit of a repeat of what we accomplished in world war ii? >> no, it is not a repeat, unfortunately. at the end of world war ii, the u.s. made major efforts, put in an enormous amount of money to help japan and germany change politically, change economically, and both nations did that. in iraq what we are seeing is not the
received praise from mitt romney's former chief foreign policy adviser on his commitment to containing the iranian nuclear program. take a listen. >> what he said in israel is, we will do everything we need to do and containment won't work. it's not a policy preference, it will not work. in a sense the president was taking on his own at home, saying containing an iran nuclear program is unworkable. and for him to say that in israel, on the ground, standing with the israeli prime minister was a powerful statement. so i think it had the effect of reassuring the prime minister. >>> and with the defense of marriage act and proposition 8 both going before the supreme court this week, it was a hot topic on many of the sunday morning shows. former adviser to president george w. bush, karl rove, was asked about gay rights and the future of the republican party on abc this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying, flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the debate over gun control was reinvigorated today, by
for so many years now. what are the prospects of that taking place. we know former foreign minister, with so much difficulty as policy minister, she will be at this dinner saturday night with netanyahu, john kerry and others trying to restart the peace talks. >> i would say to john kerry, good luck with that. if the americans really push for a renewed peace talks between the israelis and palestinians, i believe it will happen. neither side want to be the side that says no. will it be a real peace process with prospects of serious progress? i don't think so. and most analysts don't think so. because neither side is rooting for it. i always believe that time they are progress towards peace between the two sides is when each side realizes the limit of its own power. when israel realizes its weaponry will not sub jucate the palestinians forever and time is not on their side forever. until each side realizes that, i don't think there will be any real progress. there is no real demand for progress. it is also important to say that if there was a peace agreement on the table, i'm sure, and
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)